The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Global Risks Report 2020 has been issued, identifying four of the top five risks being related to societal or environmental issues, namely climate action failure, biodiversity loss, extreme weather and water crises.

The Report is a useful guide for all organizations, as these issues should be taken into consideration in any organization’s Materiality Analysis, in order to address the wider global sustainability context, on which we all have an impact on.

The 2020 Report also presents the results of a Global Risks Perception Survey, in which approximately 800 experts and decision-makers assess the likelihood and impact of 30 global risks over a 10-year horizon.


The Global Risks Report 2020 is available here for download, free of charge. In case you have any queries on the Global Risks Report 2019, please contact us.



The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Global Risks Report 2019 has been issued, identifying four of the top five risks being related to societal or environmental issues, namely failure of climate change mitigation and adaptation, extreme weather events, water crises and natural disasters.

The Report is a useful guide for all organizations, as these issues should be taken into consideration in any organization’s Materiality Analysis, in order to address the wider global sustainability context, on which we all have an impact on.

The 2019 Report also presents the results of a Global Risks Perception Survey, in which over 900 experts and decision-makers assess the likelihood and impact of 30 global risks over a 10-year horizon.


The Global Risks Report 2019 is available here for download, free of charge. In case you have any queries on the Global Risks Report 2019, please contact us.


STREAM joins forces with EFQM among 5 thought leaders (along with IBM, Great Place to Work, The Center for Competitiveness and EIPM) chosen by the EFQM to develop the Excellence Builders program, launched at the 2018 EFQM Forum held in Vienna. The program addresses 5 key business megatrends (i.e. Sustainability, Digital, Human Capital, Innovation and Business Ecosystems) by disseminating practical trainings and advanced tools to help organizations address current challenges and future trends.

The Sustainability Excellence Builder, developed in partnership between EFQM and STREAM, is a holistic program to support organizations in all aspects of their Sustainability journey, structured around three components:

Knowledge Component: Aims to understand emerging sustainability challenges and build internal knowledge to manage Sustainability, and includes among other:


Assessment Component
: Aims to measure quantitatively and assess objectively an organization's actual Sustainability maturity level, and includes among other:

  • An on-line Sustainability Assessment Tool (SAT) to quantitatively assess and graphically represent an organization's current sustainability level based on its policies, processes, performances and perception results, in order to take strategic decisions on which areas to focus on, tactical decisions on which sub-areas to improve, as well as utilize a tailor made pool of suggested improvements to easily develop a 3-5 year action plan.
  • An excel based Committed to Sustainability Assessment Tool (C2ST) to perform a sanity check vs. building blocks of sustainability as described in the C2S Framework.


Benchmarking Component
: Aims to benchmark and share knowledge with other organizations to become more sustainable, and includes among other:

  • A Community of Practice (COP) for Sustainability pioneers who would like to understand their strengths and opportunities for improvement in a structured and quantitative way, and furthermore share and learn the outcomes with peer pioneers of this benchmarking consortium.
  • An on-line Data Collection Tool (DCT) to gather data required to understand bottom line Sustainability related results, compare with peer organizations and populate a Sustainability Report, in a user friendly and secure way.


The Sustainability Excellence Builder program aims to support organizations in developing their in-house, long-term capacity to manage Sustainability issues in a structured and systematic way, rather than outsource these activities, by providing advanced knowledge, offering implementation tools and facilitating knowledge sharing among peer organizations.


For further information and participation, please visit here or contact us.


In October 2016 the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) launched the GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards) with the intention to replace the GRI G4 Guidelines by the end of June 2018.

As the transition period is now over, the GRI Standards are mandatory for any reports issued from today. In practice, this means that any reports published from here on can not claim to follow the GRI G4 Guidelines anymore.

In order to ensure a common ground transition from G4 Guidelines to GRI Standards, the GRI launched the Standards Pioneers Program, creating a pool of 55 organizations from all over the world (such as Nike, Bloomberg, Telekom Italia, Roche), among which also STREAM, acting as early adopters of the new Standards.

In case you have any queries on the new GRI Standards, please contact us or visit the respective link in GRI’s website or in STREAM’s website.



The AccountAbility released the 2018 AccountAbility Principles, its next-generation sustainability management framework and guidance.

Among the most notable changes, the AA1000AP (2018) is now positioned as a guiding framework of principles for sustainability management rather than as a prescriptive standard, as it was in 2008. It also introduces Impact as a fourth, overarching Principle, in support of results-based management and accountability.

For reports published after 1st January 2019, organisations seeking assurance through the AA1000 Assurance Standard (AA1000AS) should use the AA1000AP (2018). For reports published before this date, however, organisations can continue to use the AA1000APS (2008), allowing time for a transition period.

Upon the release of the AA1000AP (2018), the AA1000 Assurance Standard (AA1000AS) Working Group will commence work on the next version of the AA1000AS, planned for release in 2019.


The AA1000AP (2018) is available here for download, free of charge. In case you have any queries on the 2018 AccountAbility Principles, please contact us.


The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) launched the GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards), the first global standards for sustainability reporting, which aim to become the foundation for future reporting.

The new Standards will replace the GRI G4 Guidelines, as they are primarily designed to be used as an integrated set, in order to develop a sustainability report emphasising the most material topics of an organisation, as well as provide more accurate information about economic, environmental and social impacts. The GRI Standards are based on the content from the G4 Guidelines and feature the following main changes and improvements:

  • Principles: The Reporting Principles for defining Report Content and Report Quality remain the same.
  • Approach: The GRI Standards feature a new modular and interrelated approach, for a more flexible structure in terms of updating the modules separately when required.
  • Structure: The GRI Standards are divided into the Universal Standards (which include three universal Standards - Foundation, General Disclosures and Management Approach) and the Topic-Specific Standards (which include three series - Economic topics, Environmental topics and Social topics).
  • Format: The new format has clearer requirements, with mandatory requirements and recommendations clearly indicated with ‘shall’ and ‘should’ wording.
  • Simplicity: The GRI Standards feature simplified and more homogeneous language for greater clarity.
  • Clarifications: Key concepts and Disclosures from G4 are clarified to improve understanding and application of the Standards (such as how to define the Topic Boundary and how to report on Topics not covered by the GRI Standards).
  • Materiality: Clarifications have been made to important concepts of the Materiality principle, such as definition of impacts related to materiality and identification of Material Topics.
  • Content: Some Disclosures and Topics (the former ‘Aspects’) from G4 are merged or integrated into other sections.
  • Report Development: An organization is required to use the three Standards in the Universal series and only the Topic-Specific Standards that relate to the Material Topics identified.
  • Use of Standards: There are two basic approaches to use the GRI Standards: use as a set to develop a report in accordance with the Standards and use selected Standards or parts of their content. For each of these approaches, there is a corresponding claim or statement of use, which organisations are required to include in their reports or published materials with disclosures based on the Standards.
  • "In accordance with" options: The two options to prepare a report in accordance with the GRI Standards (Core and Comprehensive) remain the same. However, there have been some changes due to the new format and structure, such as use of a specific claim in a report with disclosures based on the GRI Standards and use of the modified set of General Disclosures to report contextual information about an organisation and its sustainability reporting practices.
  • Partial Use of Standards: An organization can use selected Standards or parts of their content according to its specific reporting needs, in order to report specific information, without preparing a report in accordance with the Standards. This option is referred to as "GRI-referenced" claim.
  • Transparency: An organisation is required to notify GRI when it makes an "in accordance with" claim in any report or published materials.
  • Services: GRI will start offering the GRI Materiality Disclosures Service and the Content Index Service based on the GRI Standards from October 2016 onwards.
  • Transition: The GRI Standards will be effective for reports published on or after 1 July 2018. The G4 Guidelines will remain valid until then.

Within this context, GRI has launched the Standards Pioneers Program, where STREAM participates along with 55 other organizations from all over the world (such as Nike, Bloomberg, Telekom Italia, Roche), in order to ensure a common ground transition from G4 Guidelines to GRI Standards.

In case you have any queries on the new GRI Standards, please contact us or visit the respective link.



The 5th GRI Global Conference 2016 "Empowering Sustainable Decisions", was held on 18–20 May in Amsterdam, with the participation of almost 1,200 professionals from 77 countries all over the world. During the Conference, participants exchanged leading-edge knowledge on sustainability within the overall objective to build capacity and familiarise with recent related trends.

The main outcomes of the Conference can be summarised as follows:

  • The GRI G4 Guidelines will be replaced by the GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards). The Standards will feature a new modular approach per Topic (the former ‘Aspects’) for a more flexible structure in terms of updating the modules separately, clearer requirements (with mandatory requirements and voluntary approaches clearly indicated with ‘shall’ and ‘should’ wordings) and simplified more homogeneous language. With the first set of draft Standards already available for public comment, it is expected they will be released in autumn 2016 and will be required to be used for all reports published after 1st January 2018.
  • The importance for organisations to align, measure and communicate their progress on the recently launched United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) was stressed. The SDG’s 17 objectives mark a new era of global development objectives that aim to reduce greenhouse gases, eliminate poverty and increase economic opportunities around the world.
  • Organisations will increasingly be expected to focus on data quality and quantity during their reporting process, rather than the report itself. Sustainability related information will increasingly be utilised for a variety of purposes (in management systems and by a wider scope of users), in order to enable better decision making for the organisation, as well as its Stakeholders.
  • The Digital Reporting Alliance was announced. The Alliance will create the technical infrastructure for digital reporting and a platform for filing digital reports, in order to address the lack of structured data in sustainability reporting and the lack of demand for digital reporting.

During the Conference, STREAM had the privilege to deliver one of the 10 Master Classes, as part of the official Conference Program.

STREAM's Master Class titled "Management Techniques to Handle Sustainability Effectively", helped professionals from 15 countries and 16 organisations, through simplified theory, practical case-studies and interactive workshops, to improve the way to utilise widely used management techniques (such as Balanced Scorecard, Change Management, Situational Leadership, Quality Management), in order to manage Sustainability in a more systematic, effective and efficient way.

In case you have any queries, please feel free to contact us.

    



The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) organizes the 5th GRI Global Conference 2016 "Empowering Sustainable Decisions", on 18–20 May 2016 at RAI Amsterdam, Netherlands. The Conference aims to accelerate sustainability progress by delivering innovative sustainability content and by building capacity, through diffusion of best practices, innovations and recent related trends.

In order to provide focused learning on key issues, the Conference includes a number of Master Classes, in cooperation with 14 expert organizations chosen by the GRI. STREAM has the privilege to deliver the Master Class "Management Techniques to Handle Sustainability Effectively", which will help participants understand how to utilise a number of Management Techniques, widely utilised in non-sustainability related programs (e.g. corporate restructuring, strategy development, corporate communication, people management), related both to systems (e.g.  Balanced Scorecard, Quality Management, Change Management) as well as people (e.g. Situational Leadership, Motivational Management, One-to-One Communication), which can be used to manage sustainability related topics (such as strategy development, materiality analysis, performance measurement, program deployment etc) in a more systematic, effective and efficient way.

The detailed outline of the Master Class can be found here.

In case you have any queries, please contact us.



As sustainability reporting is still a challenging practice and is constantly evolving, sharing knowledge is fundamental in refining sustainability reports. Therefore, since 2011, the GRI through its "Knowledge Share Project Portfolio" showcases the reporting practices of some of the longest-standing sustainability professionals and subject experts, in order to share insights into specific challenging GRI Indicators.

In 2013, the "Knowledge Share Project Portfolio 3", features views on how to best report on some of GRI’s most widely used – and perhaps challenging – G3.1 Indicators and how to transition them to the G4 Indicators. From economic value creation to product life cycles, community care to satisfying stakeholders the content describes the way some of the world’s most experienced sustainability reporters and subject experts tackle Indicator disclosure and shared tips on how to transfer from reporting G3.1 to G4 on specific Indicators.

As part of this publication, STREAM had the privilege to participate by sharing its views and insights regarding reporting on reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions.

To view the publication please click at the respective link.



One year from the launch of the proposal by European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services, Michel Barnier, and after extensive negotiations between the three European bodies, with a 599-55 voting result, the European Parliament decided to amend Directive 2013/34/EU (Fourth and Seventh Accounting Directives on Annual and Consolidated Accounts), which now requires mandatory disclosure of non-financial and diversity information, by an estimated 6,000 European-based "Public Interest Entities" (PIEs) or by parent companies of European-based PIEs.

Public-Interest Entities include companies of over 500 employees which are listed, as well as some unlisted companies, such as banks, insurance companies and other companies that are so designated by Member States, because of their activities, size or number of employees.

These entities will be: 

  • Required to report on environmental, social, employee-related, human rights, anti-corruption and bribery issues.
  • Required to describe their business model, policies, outcomes, risks and key performance indicators on the above issues.
  • Required to describe their diversity policy applied for management and supervisory bodies, for example age, gender, educational and professional background.
  • Encouraged to rely on recognized frameworks such as the GRI Guidelines, UNGC, UNGP on Business and Human Rights, OECD Guidelines, ISO 26000 and ILO Tripartite Declaration.

Entities will be required to report on the above issues on a "report or explain" basis, retaining flexibility to disclose relevant information in the way that they consider appropriate, whether part of their annual report, in a separate report etc.

On the other hand, certain aspects of the decision have attracted criticism:

  • The Directive does not require comprehensive reporting on environmental and social aspects (although the Commission encourages it).
  • The requirements will become into force in the not so near 2017.
  • The Commission will prepare guidelines on methodology for reporting non-financial information (including general and sectoral non-financial key performance indicators), however these are expected within the next 24 months and will be non-binding, letting little hope for comparable performance data being published.


The Directive is expected to strengthen transparency, accountability and double the number of entities currently reporting on ESG matters in the EU from an estimated 2,500. It will come into force when ratified by the EU Member States in the European Council, which is expected to formally adopt the proposal.



The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) introduced the
‘Materiality Matters check for Reports based on the G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines.

G4 has an increased emphasis on the need for organizations to focus – in the reporting process and final report – on those topics that are material to their business and their key stakeholders. This ‘materiality’ focus will make reports more relevant and more credible. This will, in turn, enable organizations to better inform markets and society on sustainability matters. The focus on materiality means that G4-based sustainability reports will focus on matters that are really critical to achieving the organization’s goals and managing its impacts on society.

To further this main concept of G4, GRI has designed the ‘Materiality Matters’ check.

The Objectives of the ‘Materiality Matters’ check are:

  • To open a dialogue with reporters before reports are published
  • To bring clarity on the location of critical content that readers can expect to find in the report
  • To focus on the main features of G4-based reports: the definition of material Aspects (or other material topics), their boundaries, and information on stakeholder engagement

The ‘Materiality Matters’ check focuses exclusively on the General Standard Disclosures G4-17 to G4-27 from the GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines and verifies that at the time of publication of the report, the locations of these disclosures were easy to find in both the Content Index and in the text of the final report.

Verifying the quality of the reported information and the process of preparing the disclosures is beyond the scope of this service.


In case you have any queries, please contact us or visit the respective link.

 



The Global Reporting Initiative published the new version of its G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines, representing the 4th generation of Sustainability Reporting Guidelines.

The new Guidelines are influenced by changes in the reporting field, such as the introduction of new concepts, trends and stakeholders' requirements, while aims to drive and direct sustainability reporting towards a simplified and materiality focused process. Key procedural issues related to the new G4 GRI guidelines include:

  • Principles: The Report Content and Report Quality Principles remain same.
  • Materiality: Describing how an organisation has identified its Material issues to be addressed in the Report and which those are, is becoming a more imperative aspect.
  • Generic Disclosures: A single generic disclosure standard can be reported on for material aspects, instead of presenting specific standard disclosures per Aspect.
  • New Disclosures: Up-to-date disclosures on governance, ethics and integrity, supply chain, anti-corruption and GHG emissions have been included.
  • Aspects: Aspects such as Supplier Assessment and Grievance Mechanisms have been added to all categories and sub-categories (besides Economic and Product Responsibility).
  • Indicators: The segmentation of indicators as Core and Additional is discontinued.
  • Application Levels: The A,B,C Application Levels will be discontinued and replaced by an “in accordance with” statement at two levels, “Core” and “Comprehensive”.
  • Level Check: Application Level checks will continue, but a decision will be taken in September 2013 for how long and under what form.
  • Transition: There will be transition period of two reporting cycles ending end of 2015, during which reporters will have the option to use G3 and G3.1.
In case you have any queries on the new G4 GRI Guidelines, please contact us or visit the respective link.

 



The Corporate Responsibility Best Practice Conference was organised by Boussias communications with the suport of STREAM, bringing together leading practices from Greek corporations (e.g. TITAN, Coca-Cola 3E, Cosmote, Carrefour, Emporiki, Athens International Airport), exceptional examples from abroad (e.g. Interface) and round table discussion of recognised Stakeholder experts (i.e. Greenpeace, WWF, Transparency International, ALBA, Athens University).


Coca-Cola HBC Greece issued its 2009 Corporate Responsibility Report, developed for the third consequtive year in cooperation with STREAM. The 2009 CR Report:

  • Is at «A» level, according to the G3 GRI Guidelines.
  • Makes reference to 166 quantitative indicators and includes 34 quantitative targets for 2010.

 

Coca-Cola HBC Greece 2009

 

The first "A" level CR Report in Greece, also checked by the Global Reporting Initiative.

 

"A" level, according to the GRI Application Levels

 

To open the Report please choose your language of preference and click on the respective flag below.

Available in:


COSMOTE Group issued its 2009 Corporate Responsibility Report, developed for the second consequtive year in cooperation with STREAM. The 2009 CR Report:

  • Is at «B+» level, according to the G3 GRI Guidelines.
  • Has been externally assured by an independent certification body.
  • Makes reference to 188 quantitative indicators, 34 graphs and 31 quantitative targets for 2010.

 

Cosmote 2009

 

Resulted a 68% increase in number of quantitative indicators and 36% in number of GRI Indicators, compared to 2008.

 

To open the Report please choose your language of preference and click on the respective flag below.

Available in:


 


The 6th People Management Executive Seminar, organised by Boussias Communications will be held on the 21st October. During the Seminar modern trends on People Management Practices will be presented. Key note Speaker will be Bill Conaty, with 40 years or experience, holding the possition of Senior Vice President Human Resources at General Electric.

Other presenters will be:

  • Leonardo Sforza, Head Research Europe and EU Affairs, Hewitt Associates
  • John Blackwell, Organizational transformation expert and writter
  • Sally McGuire, Researcher, Lancaster University School of Management
  • Mary Delaney, President, Personified, CareerBuilder
  • Emmanuel Perakis, Managing Partner, STREAM.

Emmanuel will provide a presentation on "Ηοw to facilitate Creativity and Innovation at the workplace". During the presentation, Emmanuel will present the categories of Creativity & Innovation, Case Studies from organisations around the world and 8 steps on how to facilitate Creativity and Innovation at a workplace.



Following the experts meeting which took place in Copenhagen in May, the long anticipated Guidance on Social Responsibility coded ISO26000, was distributed to a close group of about 400 acredited experts from around the World, representing ISO National Partners and D-Liaison members, for a final round of commenting and voting.

After five years of lengthy debates and inevitable compromises (as ISO26000 should take o board different cultural and ethical dimensions from around the World), the Final Draft was approved with a majority of 93% votes in favor and was launched in November 1st in Geneva.

It must be stressed that ISO26000:

  • Is available through ISO's National Partner Organisations at charge.
  • Is a Guidance standard, not a Guideline standard or a Certification standards.
  • Is structured around 7 generic priciples and subjects (Organisational Governance, Human Rights, Labour Prcatices, Environment, Fair Operating Practices, Consumer Issues, Community Involvement), in order to be applicable to all kind of organisations (corporations, NGOs, governmental institutions etc.).
  • Is not certifiable and any such claim will be considered misleading by ISO. As stated within the Guidance document "The ISO26000 provides guidance to users and is neither intended nor appropriate for certification purposes. Any offer to certify to ISO 26000 or any claim to be certified to ISO 26000 would be a misrepresentation of the intent and purpose of this International Standard". Respective position papers have been issued even by governments, such as the German.

STREAM participated in the formulation of the Guidance document since the start of the ISO26000 development process in 2005, via its Managing Partner acting as one of the accredited experts, initially as head of the Greek Mirror Committee and soon after as EFQM Representative.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact us, watch the related video or connect to the respective ISO website.



WWF published the 2009 Environmental Management & Disclosure Index (EMDI) Report. The assessment was conducted solely by WWF, based on a customised methodology developed by STREAM. The objectives of the assessment are to:

  • Quantitatively map the level of the Greek market, in terms of managing environmental issues and disclosing respective information to the public, in order to facilitate market improvements.
  • Objectively identifying good practices implemented by organisations.
  • Provide a systematic and structured feedback to organisations.

 The customised EMDI methodology:

  • Is segmented in 8 Domains, emphasising both management practices followed (3 Enabler Domains: Management, Materiality, Awareness), as well as botton line results achieved (5 Result Domains: Energy, Water, Materials, Hazardous, Other).
  • Assesses 108 environmental issues in total.
  • Utilises aspects and principles from guidelines and systems (like GRI G3 Guidelines, EFQM Model, EMAS, ISO14001 etc.), over-exceeding their requirements.
  • Was applied by WWF to assess 40 representative organisations (from multinational corporations to public organisations), segmented in 6 business sectors, with different Domain weighting applied for each sector, in order to map the overall status of the market.
  • Utilised strictly publicly available information for the assessment.

You can download the full EMDI 2009 Report from the WWF website or by choosing your language of preference and clicking on the flag below:

Available in:


 

 


CARREFOUR issued its 1st Sustainability & Responsibility Report, developed in cooperation with STREAM. The 2009 Report:

  • Is at «B» level, according to the G3 GRI Guidelines.
  • Makes reference to almost 100 quantitative indicators and 11 quantitative targets for 2010.

 

Carrefour 2009

 

1st corporate CR Report - Self-declared as "B" Level, according to the GRI Application Levels.

To open the Report please click on the flag below.

Available in:


 


The Corporate Responsibility Best Practice Conference, focusing on Sustainability Case Studies organised by Boussias communications, with the support of STREAM, bringing together leading practices from Greek corporations (e.g. Coca-Cola 3E, Cosmote, Lafarge, Microsoft, Carrefour, Emporiki, L'Oreal), exceptional examples from abroad (e.g. Unilever Group) and round table discussions of recognised Stakeholder experts (i.e. Greenpeace, WWF, HMA).

             

                                  


 


The European Commission has previously defined Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as “a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis”.

Through the new CSR Strategy 2011-2014, the Commission puts forward a new definition of CSR as “the responsibility of enterprises for their impacts on society”. Respect for applicable legislation, and for collective agreements between social partners, is a prerequisite for meeting that responsibility. To fully meet their corporate social responsibility, enterprises should have in place a process to integrate social, environmental, ethical, human rights and consumer concerns into their business operations and core strategy in close collaboration with their stakeholders.

For further information you can download the EU communication paper.



As part of the European Commission’s project “Networking for better CSR Advice to SMEs” a two-day international networking conference took place in Berlin. The event brought together a diverse group of some 100 practitioners and experts from across Europe, who advise and support SMEs in their CSR activities, including STREAM. The networking conference offered participants a unique opportunity to learn from their European peers, exchange best practices and build networks with others in the field. For more information, click here. (Source: European Commission)


                           

                                          



The Global Reporting Initiative is in the process of developing the new G4 GRI Guidelines, planned to be launched in May 2013. G4 is GRI’s fourth generation of Sustainability Reporting Guidelines.

The Guidelines development is influenced by changes in the reporting field, such as the introduction of new concepts, trends and tools, and requests by new players. By developing guidance, GRI aims to drive and direct sustainability reporting, towards a sustainable global economy.


In case you would like to be informed about the process, the current status, but also comment on the content of G4 (till 25th September 2012), please visit the respective link.








WWF published the 2011 Environmental Management & Disclosure Index (EMDI) Report, addressing respective results for 2009 and 2010 (published till end of 2011). The assessment was conducted solely by WWF, based on a customised methodology developed pro-bono by STREAM. The objectives of the assessment are to:

  • Quantitatively map the level of the Greek market, in terms of managing environmental issues and disclosing respective information to the public, in order to facilitate market improvements.
  • Objectively identifying good practices implemented by organisations.
  • Provide a systematic and structured feedback to organisations.

This year, internationally leading companies on sustainability practices Interface and UNILEVER Group agreed to carry out a voluntary evaluation of public information relating to their global environmental activities, utilizing the EMDI methodology, in order to provide a benchmark of excellent performance and identify own areas for improvement.

The customised EMDI methodology:

  • Is segmented in 8 Domains, emphasising both management practices followed (3 Enabler Domains: Management, Materiality, Awareness), as well as botton line results achieved (5 Result Domains: Energy, Water, Materials, Hazardous, Other).
  • Assesses 108 environmental issues in total.
  • Utilises aspects and principles from guidelines and systems (like GRI G3 Guidelines, EFQM Model, EMAS, ISO14001 etc.), over-exceeding their requirements.
  • Was applied by WWF to assess 40 representative organisations (from multinational corporations to public organisations), segmented in 6 business sectors, with different Domain weighting applied for each sector, in order to map the overall status of the market.
  • Utilised strictly publicly available information for the assessment.


You can download the full EMDI 2011 Report from the WWF website or by choosing your language of preference and clicking on the flag below:

Available in:



COSMOTE Group issued its 2009 Corporate Responsibility Report, developed for second consequtive year in cooperation with STREAM. The 2009 CR Report:

  • Is at «B+» level, according to the G3 GRI Guidelines.
  • Has been assured by an indepented external certiifcation body.
  • Makes reference to χχ quantitative indicators and includes xx quantitative targets for 2010.

 

Cosmote 2009

Resulted a 68% increase in number of quantitative indicators and 36% in number of GRI Indicators, compared to 2008.

To open the Report please choose your language of preference and click on the respective flag below.

Available in:

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